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I write suspenseful ( and sometimes surreal) stories about love and loss and learning how to live again.

I need your help in choosing a narrator

I’m going to release an audio book of my novel THE LESSER PEOPLE next spring, and need your help in choosing the narrator! Just leave your feedback below. Thanks!

The ebook and paperback will be coming out in October (you can pre-order your copy from TLP on Amazon, and TLP from Smashwords, and TLP on Goodreads.)

Here are the two audio samples. I really like both of them and look forward to hearing your picks of who should read it!

Clay’s reading:

 

Tom’ s reading:

You can check out their other work:

Clay Lomakayu

Tom Sleeker

Cover THE LESSER PEOPLE-page-0 (2)

About THE LESSER PEOPLE

The Lesser People is a poignant, brutal, and touching story about how our decisions, and those of others, haunt us. It explores family and social conditioning, and how we exorcise our demons–often too late–in our struggle to become more human.

On a snowy Detroit night Elijah Irons, now an old man, tells a black nurse a haunting story from the darkest summer of his childhood in Forksville, Mississippi. He shares his experience with the rising racial tensions in their community and the discord within their own home since Eli, like his father Hank, think of Negroes as ordinary people, while the rest of their community think of them as The Lesser People.

He shares how his father arrests Uncle Tommy for stealing Army rifles and selling them to the KKK, and why he walks free since Eli’s grandpa is the mayor. He talks about Isaiah—a blind black boy, and servant of a local preacher—who Eli finds murdered on a river bank, and how that boy had sung the blues until people robbed him of his innocence and his future.

After the police investigate and brush Isaiah’s murder aside, blaming a transient for the crime, Eli’s father decides to make a stand against his father and the town. But things go severely wrong. Other than Preacher, everyone wants Eli’s family to get out of town. Elijah’s father refuses to go anywhere. The consequences of his decision, coupled with the desperate move his sons make, produce a mountain of heartache, grief and sorrow for his family, but they also produce unlikely heroes.

The Lesser People is a poignant, brutal, and touching story about how our decisions, and those of others, haunt us. It explores family and social conditioning, and how we exorcise our demons–often too late–in our struggle to become more human.

The Lesser People available for Pre-order

I’m very excited to announce my latest Crime novel THE LESSER PEOPLE is available for pre-order! You can reserve a copy for Kindle here, or in another format here.  Pre-order now to save a couple bucks because the price will go up the first week after release.

I’ll be sharing some behind-the-scenes stuff about this novel over the next eight weeks! Injustice is something that has always intrigued me.

Please feel free to spread the word about the novel to anyone it might appeal to. Thanks for your support!

All the best,

Lee

About the novel...
Cover THE LESSER PEOPLE-page-0 (2)
On a snowy Detroit night Elijah Irons, now an old man, tells a black nurse a haunting story from the darkest summer of his childhood in Forksville, Mississippi. He shares his experience with the rising racial tensions in their community and the discord within their own home since Eli, like his father Hank, think of Negroes as ordinary people, while the rest of their community think of them as The Lesser People. 

He shares how his father arrests Uncle Tommy for stealing Army rifles and selling them to the KKK, and why he walks free since Eli’s grandpa is the mayor. He talks about Isaiah—a blind black boy, and servant of a local preacher—who Eli finds murdered on a river bank, and how that boy had sung the blues until people robbed him of his innocence and his future. 

After the police investigate and brush Isaiah’s murder aside, blaming a transient for the crime, Eli’s father decides to make a stand against his father and the town. But things go severely wrong. Other than Preacher, everyone wants Eli’s family to get out of town. Elijah's father refuses to go anywhere. The consequences of his decision, coupled with the desperate move his sons make, produce a mountain of heartache, grief and sorrow for his family, but they also produce unlikely heroes. 

The Lesser People is a poignant, brutal, and touching story about how our decisions, and those of others, haunt us. It explores family and social conditioning, and how we exorcise our demons--often too late--in our struggle to become more human. 

 

Released: WITH FURY IN HAND

With Fury in Hand book cover

I’m excited to let everybody know DarkFuse has released my latest Crime novella WITH FURY IN HAND! You can grab your copy from Amazon here.

The first reviews have come in.

Michael Parker at Crime Fiction Lover.
Paul Nelson at Paul Read or Dead.
And reviews on Goodreads.
And reviews on Amazon.

I hope you’re all well and living life to the fullest!

Best,

Lee

With Fury in Hand

With Fury in Hand book cover

Super excited about this book coming out in May, 2015 from DarkFuse! You can pre-order it here!

Over the next seventeen hours, on the unforgiving streets of Flint, Michigan, five people with troubled pasts and uncertain futures will collide in a devastating chain of intertwining events.

Through the eyes of a homeless orphan, a banking executive with disturbing fantasies, an adulterous wife, a young prostitute with a stash of money, and a man trying to leave his criminal days behind, you will witness their pain and feel their loss.

Redemption requires forgiveness, but fury serves no master.

A Look into My Heart

Hi, I’m author Lee Thompson. For those that don’t know me (and those who don’t know me well, since I am quite private), I’d like to take a minute to fill you in.

I’ve recently turned 39. When I was younger I moved all over. I’ve lived a lot in the country, in small towns, and in several cities. My favorite places are the Colorado Springs area (I can’t get enough of the mountains), and San Diego.

I come from a pretty creative family (my grandfather played guitar and painted; my mother writes novels, my brother is talented in multiple artistic areas and works on a program for Reelz TV.) It took me thirty years to find writing and it’s changed me for the better, a little more every year.

Some of my core beliefs are: All we have in life are our choices; who we choose to invest time in, who we love, who we hate, what we choose to do with our lives. I believe we can help others in some small way. I believe that sometimes violence is necessary to protect ourselves and those we love. I believe the world would be a sad, sad place without great books and art and music. I believe life is over in the blink of an eye so we better make the most of it. I believe in change because even though who I was when I was younger has shaped me into who I am now, I’m a much better, more well-balanced person.

Interests outside of writing: Playing guitar, watching great shows and movies, learning new things, traveling, and the two special girls in my life.

My main goals for writing are: I want to make people feel and think. I want to entertain too, but I also want to do more than write escapist fiction. I want to sell film rights. I want to get to the point where I can move thirty thousand copies a year so my gal can quit working and we can have more money to travel and show little Rae the world.
I typically write three kinds of stories.

#1: Coming-of-age because I feel even as adults many of us are still discovering who we are, what we believe, our place in the world, and our purpose for being here. I love classic coming-of-age stories like Stand by Me, Leon The Professional, The Catcher in the Rye, Grendel, etc.

I’ve written a number of them: Earthly Things, The Devil Gave Them Black Wings, The 1st Division Omnibus (Red Piccirilli books), The Lesser People, Beneath the Weeping Willow, Daddy Screamed With Us, As I Embrace My Jagged Edges, and An Ounce of Mercy.

#2: Supernatural Tales because what we cannot see and what might be all around us fascinates me. I love authors like Clive Barker, Stephen King, Peter Straub, John Gardner, Jack Cady, John Connolly, Robert Dunbar, Douglas Clegg, and Mercedes M. Yardley.

I’ve also written a number of Supernatural stories: Shine Your Light on Me, Earthly Things, The Devil Gave Them Black Wings, the Division Mythos (7 books so far), When We Join Jesus in Hell, and Gossamer.

#3: Crime/Mystery/Noir. I love authors like Dennis Lehane, Les Edgerton, James Lee Burke, Donald Westlake, Lawrence Block, and John D. MacDonald. I like how Crime fiction explores morality or lack thereof.

I’ve written a number of them in the last two years, books like When We Join Jesus in Hell, A Beautiful Madness, It’s Only Death, The Lesser People, After the Fog Clears, Shine Your Light on Me, and With Fury in Hand.

Thanks to everyone who has given my stories a try. Writers need readers, and readers need writers. Thanks for being part of my journey.

–Lee

Inside THE DEVIL GAVE THEM BLACK WINGS Character/Conflicts

Inside “The Devil Gave Them Black Wings” Characters/Conflicts

I’m doing a series of fun insider posts on my novel THE DEVIL GAVE THEM BLACK WINGS which will be released March 17th, 2015. I’ll share why the setting is personal and unique to me; I’ll share about the main characters and their conflicts; my beliefs on Grief and Healing—which is essential to moving on with our lives after tragedy strikes us; I’ll share the inspirations for segments of the storyline; how racism isolates a small black family when their daughter is kidnapped; and we’ll hit the points of curses and blessings, how each can pivot into the realm of the other.
I hope you find this interesting, and I’m glad to give you a look inside my head and the inner mechanics of one of my latest novels.
Please feel free to share the posts. And if you have any questions you can ask me on my Goodreads Q & A here

Happy reading!

Lee

black wings cover for kindle

 

In THE DEVIL GAVE THEM BLACK WINGS a cursed angel battling a paternal complex shadows an abducted child with a vengeful father who will do anything to get her back… He mourns the loss of innocence in the young neighbor girl who is determined to find the kidnapped child… And he seeks to offer peace to a despondent husband returning to his wife’s childhood home after her death on 9/11…

Through triumphs and setbacks, unlikely friends forge an unbreakable bond, and find a way to always remember the value of love and courage.

*****

Welcome to the second post about the inner mechanics of my forthcoming Supernatural Thriller THE DEVIL GAVE THEM BLACK WINGS. If you missed the first post, you can read it here.

There are a number of major characters in this novel, which I like because they’re all connected and are irrevocably so by the end. Having multiple POVs offers a lot of room for contrasts and misunderstandings between characters. I’d like to share a quick sketch of each character, what they want and need, and the major dilemmas they face.

Sebastian: A doomed angel, he takes his charges very seriously, and it drives him crazy that all the girls he guards are cursed with tragic lives. He can do very little to protect them, since he is unable to communicate with them. Until the end of this book he sees the human story as one large tragedy.

Jacob Elder: Wants to be left alone to deal with his grief (he tends to wallow in it for a while until the angel Sebastian begins bothering him.) When a local black girl is kidnapped from the park where Jacob has been sitting and watching children play for the last three days, a policeman puts Jacob at the top of his list of suspects.

Nina Kunis: Wants a purpose for her life, wants to matter, wants to clear Jacob’s name and find out who really kidnapped young Robin Stark. When she begins to suspect that her older boyfriend, who is not shy of his attraction to young girls, is behind Robin’s disappearance, she isn’t sure what to do. A local reporter named Caitlain Reno also interviews her because Nina lives across the street from the park and Robin Stark’s father works with Nina’s mother. Caitlain is upset when Nina says the reporter is exploiting Robin and her family to make her career. But Caitlain tells her little black girls have been taken for the past decade and no one with any power has done anything because there is still a deep-seated racism permeating the town.

Victor: Jacob’s brother-in-law. Wants to bring Jacob home, back to New York, afraid that Jacob will hurt himself due to depression and hopelessness. He tracks Jacob down using his credit card purchases, and ends up knocking on doors until he finds Nina, who he believes has seen Jacob from the way her face changes when Victor shows her Jacob’s photograph. Nina’s stepfather Rick calls the police but Victor has ties to the mob in New York, and doesn’t tolerate much from small town law enforcement. His contempt for them only gets him and Jacob into more trouble.

Caitlain Reno: A reporter whose main goal is to write a book about the abductions of ten young black girls (over the past decade) in a town that tries to appear spic and span. She doesn’t realize the danger she’s in until the child murderer visits her home.

Richard Stark: Robin Stark’s father. More than anything he wants his daughter back. He was there at the park with her the day she was taken, had left her on the merry-go-round while he ran to the ice cream truck to get each of them their favorites. When he thinks the police are taking too long to save his daughter, and under his wife’s demands that he do something, he compiles a list of local sexual predators and begins knocking on doors, hoping he can shake his daughter’s kidnapper out of his nest. He has always been a law-abiding man, but fully accepts he will have to break laws, and live with the consequences, once he finds Robin and the man who took her from him.

Thanks for taking the time to read and share this. If you’d like to pre-order a copy of THE DEVIL GAVE THEM BLACK WINGS, you can do so here

Inside “The Devil Gave Them Black Wings” Setting

 

I’m doing a series of fun insider posts on my novel THE DEVIL GAVE THEM BLACK WINGS  which will be released March 17th, 2015. I’ll share why the setting is personal and unique to me; I’ll share about the main characters and their conflicts; my beliefs on Grief and Healing—which is essential to moving on with our lives after tragedy strikes us; I’ll share the inspirations for segments of the storyline; how racism isolates a small black family when their daughter is kidnapped; and we’ll hit the points of curses and blessings, how each can pivot into the realm of the other.

I hope you find this interesting, and I’m glad to give you a look inside my head and the inner mechanics of one of my latest novels.

Please feel free to share the posts. And if you have any questions you can ask me on my Goodreads Q & A here.

Happy reading!

Lee

  

Inside “The Devil Gave Them Black Wings” Setting

black wings cover for kindle

 

In THE DEVIL GAVE THEM BLACK WINGS a cursed angel battling a paternal complex shadows an abducted child with a vengeful father who will do anything to get her back… He mourns the loss of innocence in the young neighbor girl who is determined to find the kidnapped child… And he seeks to offer peace to a despondent husband returning to his wife’s childhood home after her death on 9/11… 

Through triumphs and setbacks, unlikely friends forge an unbreakable bond, and find a way to always remember the value of love and courage.

 *****

When I was in my early twenties I was reckless and impulsive. I was an alcoholic without a car, a violent young man with a large chip on his shoulder, and I had tired of where I grew up. I wanted adventure, a calling, a purpose for my life. I started reading the Bible, and believed that if I learned to rely on something outside of myself, I’d make better choices, maybe I’d be happier. Self-pity and anger were holding me back and I did my best to purge myself of their venom. I decided, somewhat out of the blue, that I wanted to be a pastor. I wanted to teach something good, values that I believed I needed to aspire to, and I wanted to learn by listening to others, maybe help them in some small way. So, without a car, with sixty-something dollars to my name after buying a bus ticket, I rode down to Cleveland, Tennessee with a small bag of clothing and a guitar.

I choose this place in Tennessee because it had Lee University, where I could go to their music school and study to be a preacher. I figured the influence of others with a devout seriousness would help me stay on track. But I was dirt poor when I got there, I didn’t know a soul, I was homeless, hungry, and frustrated. In a homeless shelter on the bad side of town there were all kinds of addicts. I could relate to them because, although I hadn’t had a drink in a year, I wanted one every single day.

It was a time of turning points, big changes. I did great for a while, got on my feet, made friends, stayed away from the bottle which pretty much represented a loaded pistol I used to stick in my mouth for the better part of every day.

Cleveland, Tennessee is a Bible belt. A dry county. That helped for a while. But then I visited a local music store and made friends with this guitar player (Don Wade) who was kind of a mentor to me. I went out and watched his band play. As much as I wanted to be good, I missed the seedy sides of life, and I liked the neighboring town Chattanooga for all the enticement it offered. I didn’t fit in with most of the Christians I’d met. They were all so naïve (or so it appeared) and I felt out of place, like a square peg among a bunch circles.

It was more natural to return to the type of things I knew. I walked everywhere (I love walking because it’s good exercise and gives me time to think). I went all over town, all the time, the good parts, the bad parts, just a wayfaring stranger in a strange land. I didn’t hunt trouble, but I didn’t shy from it either.

I gave up the idea of preaching. I didn’t feel worthy, didn’t feel as if I had anything to say, and to me Christian meant Christ-like, and I was far from that. But I watched everybody and listened, and there were a million small heartaches all around, and I found I could listen to a stranger and it seemed to help them because nobody else gave them the time of day.

In THE DEVIL GAVE THEM BLACK WINGS, my thirteen-year-old character Nina Kunis has this trait. She likes to give people a chance to open up. For her—pretty much still forming into who she will be when the story begins—life is full of mystery, darkened corners, and exquisite possibilities. But there is a danger in the connections we make, a risk we have to take if we want to truly connect with someone else, which Nina learns the hard way.

And then there is Jacob, who brings his wife Santana’s ashes back to her home town from New York. After she dies in the towers on 9/11, he carries an excessive amount of guilt because she had wanted to return home, to Cleveland, Tennessee, the week the Trade Towers were hit, but Jacob had refused her. He was a bit of a control freak then, and like most control freaks, he did not want to risk losing her to her childhood memories when the life he had built for himself in New York was exactly what he wanted. But his refusal to give her what she wanted, just a simple trip home, carried her down among the rubble at Ground Zero. To make matters worse for him, a young black girl goes missing, and a local policeman designates him as the prime suspect because Jacob appears homeless, and has spent three days in that park watching the children play before the girl was taken.

There is so much more I wish I could tell you, but I’ll save it for other posts about the inner workings of this novel. I’ll wrap it up for now with the whole point about what I learned while living there and why I felt it was the perfect setting for this story.

When I lived down there, one of the first places I lived was in a shitty motel room that cost about a hundred bucks a week. I went to this church I liked, and there was this constant bombardment of the wholesomeness and sincerity of the congregation in contrast to the shitty neighborhood, the fights and drug deals and crack whores, I had to return to. I could have just returned home, back to Michigan, but I was stubborn, and I think there was a part of me that liked how vastly different the two worlds were that I resided in.

The light and the dark meet in certain areas. There can be great love, tremendous hope, butted up against violence and despair. And that’s what THE DEVIL GAVE THEM BLACK WINGS is all about: great love and tremendous hope butted up against violence and despair. The novel is a slow burn and I hope that by the time you finish it you’ll know these characters better than you know your family.

Thanks for taking the time to read and share this. If you’d like to pre-order a copy of THE DEVIL GAVE THEM BLACK WINGS, you can do so here

Thanks again for all the support!

If you haven’t signed up for my newsletter, you can do so here, and receive a FREE Kindle copy of my Supernatural Thriller EARTHLY THINGS.

Interview with Cinematographer Richard Vialet

 

This marks the first time I’ve interviewed a cinematographer, so this is pretty cool. I learned about Richard because he reviewed my novel IT’S ONLY DEATH and my novella WHEN WE JOIN JESUS IN HELL. Like most creators, I like people who like my work. No shame there. Thanks to Richard Vialet for taking the time and sharing about himself and what he’s learned with his craft. For fellow writers, up-and-comers and such, I believe we can learn a lot from other creative people (I learn all the time from musicians, athletes, artists, poets, other writers, film makers, etc.) So enjoy! And spread the word about the interview. You can check out Richard’s website here to see cool stills and video clips from projects he’s done

How much artistic leeway do you have with each project? Or does it vary a lot from director to director?

Richard Vialet: Yes, it definitely varies from director to director. I’ve worked with some directors who are very specific with the shots that they want from scene to scene, providing storyboards and other references, while others are less specific visually, and lean on me to craft the shots while they just work with actors. I try to adapt my working style to fit the style that the director prefers. Most directors give me carte blanche on lighting decisions though, with the occasional suggestions on set. But I never plan a look and approach without letting the director know my intentions first.

What is the most valuable lesson you’ve learned so far?

Richard Vialet: Probably the most valuable lesson for me at this point in my career is to keep an open mind about every project and everyone you meet, and always treat everyone with respect. I might find a project that doesn’t sound very attractive at first, but by keeping an open mind, you might discover potential. For example, a project might not be paid very well, but the director may be an undiscovered talent and have a unique vision that could lead to great things down the road. So you never know who you’re meeting with. Another great lesson I’ve learned is to stay healthy. I’m still working on that! We work demanding hours that are taxing on the body, and I would love to be doing this job for as long as possible.

What’s a typical film project like? What steps do you have to take to do your job with as few hitches as possible?

Richard Vialet: On a typical film project, the crew is basically just trying the tell the story and support the director’s vision as much as possible. while also trying to predict any obstacles that might pop up on set and being prepared to tackle them.

The key to doing this is: Pre-production. Pre-production. Pre-production. There is a lot of money on the line, and unless you’re David Fincher, Steven Spielberg, or Chris Nolan, you almost never time to get shoot the movie you want to make. So scouting locations as much as possible, being familiar with the script, getting on the same page as the director and the other department heads, and having a clear idea of how I want to approach every scene, goes a long way to a successful shoot.

What are some of your favorite films?

Richard Vialet: 1) Casablanca – It’s a timeless, universally enjoyable, and nearly perfect story of romance and heroism, and explores the choice between striving for personal happiness and acting for something that’s bigger than yourself.
2) L.A. Confidential – It’s probably the best movie adaptation of a book, skillfully converting one of the densest crime novels ever into a 2-hour, 20-minute movie that is really entertaining and extremely well-made. It also has one of the best casts of any movie.
3) Se7en – The textbook movie for what a great psychological thriller can be. It has a creepy and original concept and script and has such a dark, oppressive mood, that after your finished and watch it again, you’re surprised by how little violence and graphic images there are. A feat of filmmaking.
4) Sunset Boulevard – It was amazing how modern Billy Wilder’s movies felt. And this one was his greatest. It’s one of the most scathing satire on Hollywood to date and I consider Gloria Swanson’s tightrope walk of a performance one of the best ever.
5) The Treasure of the Sierra Madre – It’s pretty cool that this movie is still endlessly entertaining even though it was made in 1948. It’s an awesome adventure about how greed slowly corrupts and becomes a greater danger to the characters than bandits, wild animals, or the elements.
6) A Separation – Proof that great writing and acting is all you need. It’s interesting how this small Iranian family drama was ten times more riveting than most of the big-budget action movies I’ve seen.

Who inspires you?

Richard Vialet: My mother Eveth, cinematographers Rodrigo Prieto, Harris Savides, Greig Fraser, and Bradford Young, late photographer Gordon Parks, and directors Sidney Lumet and Steven Spielberg.

How did you get your start in the film industry?

Richard Vialet: I enrolled at Howard university in Washington D.C with the goal of becoming an actor and film director. But I fell in love with cinematography and decided to focus on that exclusively. I was then accepted into the prestigious American Film Institute Conservatory as a cinematographer and after graduating from there, I’ve been working, doing what I love ever since!

I know you love to read, who are five of your favorite authors?

Richard Vialet:

1) Stephen King is truly a master storyteller who”s not only entertaining but knows how to skillfully use the art of the written word to tell engaging stories. And he’s constantly challenging himself and evolving. I think King should be included more in talks about the greatest modern American authors.

2) Dennis Lehane is one of our greatest crime writers. His books have a great balance of character development and plot and has yet to write a bad book in my opinion. Mystic River is one of my favorite novels, Gone, Baby Gone is the best detective novel I’ve read to date, and Shutter Island is a great atmospheric psychological thriller.

3) George Pelecanos’s urban morality tales and tragedies continue to touch me. He writes some of the most authentic dialogue and explorations of inner city life than most authors and always treats his characters with love and respect. I feel like I know the people in his books.

4) I recently started reading Junot Díaz and I love how reading his books feel like hanging with a buddy and hearing some good stories about young lovelorn guys and failed romance.

5) I’ve also just started reading Lawrence Block and his writing and crafting of plot seems so effortless. He makes it look so easy.

*Other favorites include the great Walter Mosley, David Goodis (the poet of depression and urban despair), Megan Abbott, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Robert McCammon, Scott B. Smith, Jake Vander Ark, and Chester Himes.

I’m sure you travel a lot, correct? Did you ever fall in love with a particular setting while filming?

Richard Vialet: I fall in love with at least some aspect of everywhere I’ve traveled; I just love to discover new places. But the Pacific coast of Costa Rica might be my favorite so far, and looked great on camera. I’ve also shot in the Redwood forests of Northern California and that was mind-blowing! I kept thinking about the Endor scenes in Return of the Jedi!

You’ve already been part of some great projects. What is something you’d like to achieve that you haven’t done yet?

Richard Vialet: Of course, every filmmaker is dying to get the next game-changing script. But yes, I’ve been fortunate to work on a wide variety of genres with their own individual challenges. But I would love to shoot a Western. A serious one, with classic themes and a great villain. I’m a huge Western movie fan. I think a musical would be tons of fun as well!

What are you working on now? Can you tell us a little about it?

Richard Vialet: I can’t talk lot about the specifics, but it’s a sequel to a popular revenge thriller remake. At first, I wasn’t excited about it because I’m not really a fan of the gory genre that the first movie belongs to. But after a director I’d worked with before signed on and I read the script, I realized that there was more of character and story in this sequel and I was excited about doing an installment that brought something new to the genre.

Thanks so much for taking time to answer questions, Richard!

Again, check out Richard’s website here!

RELEASE DAY: It’s Only Death

its_only_death (2) book cover

My second Crime novel IT’S ONLY DEATH is available today! If it’s something you think you’d be interested in, you can order your Kindle or paperback copy here.

There are three new reviews you can check out, too. One from Jon Recluse, one from Michael Parker over at Crime Fiction Lover, and another from I Heart Reading. Thanks to all the reviewers!

Book Description:

Six years ago James blew town after killing his cop-father in a bank job gone bad. When his sister informs him that their mother’s health is fading fast, he returns home, wanting to make peace with her before she passes.

But James quickly finds there is little peace left for him at his childhood home.

His father’s old partner has been biding his time, waiting for a chance at retribution, and finally discovers James is back. But he’s only one of the many shady characters James must face if he is to survive the next few days.

Not only must James survive his return, he must also face the devastation he left behind, the shattered pieces of what remained of his life before he was forced to run.

Now his days on the run are over.

Upon the edge of reckoning, James’s past comes full circle to the final showdown with his personal demons and the devils that are closing in.

It’s Only Death is an explosive, gritty tale of urban crime and one man’s descent into the nightmares in the darkest recesses of our society.

Happy reading!

P.s. Don’t forget to sign-up for my newsletter to get your FREE Kindle copy of my Supernatural Thriller EARTHLY THINGS!

THE GRAVE DARK AND DEEP

Here’s a new novel opening I wrote this morning. I’ll probably tackle this book before I start the second BROKEN BOY SOLDIERS novel. I want to tip my hat to some heroes like John D. MacDonald and Donald Westlake with this book. If this is your kind of story, would you want to read more after the opening here?

 

THE GRAVE DARK AND DEEP

By

Lee Thompson

 

At dawn, on a warm summer day high in the Rockies, they stripped him and nailed his nuts to a tree stump and left him to die.

His brothers in blue: One old partner who had warned him to keep his nose out of Mr. Derringer’s business; the other a new cop, young, cocky, a kid who had never spoken a word to Roger White.

They made their way out of the forest and back to the field their truck was parked in, while Roger bit through his lower lip and tried not to move a muscle. The pain was so intense that black dots hung like a film over his eyes. His pulse beat recklessly in his temple. His jaw ached from locking the scream in. He hadn’t wanted to give them any satisfaction. But as soon as they were out of sight, he sobbed, unable to look down at the wreckage of his scrotum. Blood was hot, but cooling quickly, on the inside of his thighs. He feared passing out, what further damage might that do?

Immediate worries.

There were others, but they didn’t hold much precedence now.

He turned his head with excruciating slowness. They’d left the ruined girl’s body ten feet away, at the edge of a wet depression. She was on her left side, facing away from him. There was blood on the insides of her thighs too. The only thing he had to be thankful for was that he couldn’t see her young smashed face. Just the blonde hair, the slope of naked shoulder, the rise of hip, the milky skin somehow bleached.

And for a while there was only the two of them and the quiet, barren wilderness…

 ###

My latest Crime novel, IT’S ONLY DEATH, is coming out from DarkFuse in a couple days. You can buy it here! 

I also have a Supernatural Thriller, THE DEVIL GAVE THEM BLACK WINGS, coming out March 17th, which you can pre-order here.

Thanks for reading! – Lee